TESOL

Have just signed up for my online TESOL (Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages) course.  This will require some discipline.

It’s a 100 hour course, and since I’m leaving in just over 3 months, I’ll need to do about 10 hours of work on it per week in order to finish in time.  If I stick to that schedule religiously, I’ll be done in 2.5 months, but I’m not normally one to stick to anything religiously, so I’ll need those extra couple weeks.  I’ve signed up for an online course instead of a classroom course, not because I’m trying to get by with less work, but because the price is about 1/5th of what it costs to do it in class, and I don’t exactly have an extra $1,000 just laying around.  Ordinarily I’d be skeptical of any online class that claims to be equivalent to an in-person version, but they were recommended by my recruiter (Footprints), and apparently the Korean government does not specify whether your class needs to be in person or not.  As long as the class is 100 hours and you have a certificate to prove that, they will accept it as legitimate training.  You don’t actually even have to take a TESOL course to teach English in S. Korea, but you get a slight bump in pay, which is nice.  However, I would do the course regardless, because otherwise, I will have no idea where to begin when trying to teach people english!

Still not freaking out yet about leaving, though I am trying to really appreciate spring in LA, since I might not see it again for a while.   I think a little about the things I will miss…my surrogate cat (officially belonging to one of my roommates, but mine by default since he’s quasi-moved out), the familiarity of knowing my way around, of being able to read signs, of chain restaurants, of old friends.  The house where I’ve lived for the past 8 years.  Driving?  Hmm.  I might miss that, and I might not.  Who misses traffic?  Hikes near the beach —  I wonder if there will be good hikes near where I’ll be living, or bike paths, or yoga classes.  I wonder how hard it will be to determine which bottle is shampoo when I’m looking for it in the drugstore and all the labels are in Korean.   I guess that’s all part of the adventure!

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